Genuinely really pleased to hear that people are starting on the ‘better job adverts = improved diversity’ journey.

We’ve seen this time and time again. In fact, we’ve managed to write adverts that appeal to men when too many women apply for roles. Which is often the complete opposite of what a client is trying to achieve, but we responded to that request, as the gender wasn’t balanced, yes, they had too many females!

We’ve also written copy to appeal to a broad range of apprentices. The result of which was a 60% non-white hiring metric, which, even for London is a fantastic achievement.

We’ve known for a while that the words we use in adverts really matter, and for some the words:

“Good personality – ability to deal with male banter and be sociable but not distracting”

simply describe who they’re looking for.

And for others it means they want women to be passive, good looking, but not too good looking; because we don’t want the men distracted from their work.

Just for the sake of clarity, I sit in the second camp and couldn’t read it any other way. 

I’m simply assuming nobody in their right mind would post something like that if they sat in the second camp. And if you missed it here’s the story about that advert: https://recruitingtimes.org/news/22484/job-advert-asks-candidates-can-deal-male-banter/

So, hopefully, we’re all agreed that this is the right thing to do, and surely it should be ‘the rule’ and not ‘the exception’.

If I was going to nit-pick it would be that an ‘online tool’ was used. And personally, I don’t think that’s what’s needed.

I have no issue in that’s what’s been done, the results are clearly great. The problem I have is that people are people. And when people read, they interpret things in a certain way.

Using that offensive sentence above and using a free ‘online tool’...

 ...it clearly states:

"You're not using any male-coded or female-coded words"

But we, as people, know that to be wrong. Because we don’t read words, we read sentences and paragraphs. And we feel.

When we read the text makes us feel. It could be excited, it could be sad. It could be angry. The important thing is that it makes us feel.

And no matter how good an ‘online tool’ is it will never feel. Not in my lifetime anyway.

If you want to talk about writing advert copy or analysing diversity data throughout your talent pipeline, please feel free to get in touch with me.